Instructions for Presenters

General Posters

General Posters

Note: There are TWO types of poster presentations, general and thematic. Please make sure you know which type of poster presentation you will be presenting before making your poster.

  • Posters should be no more than 48” by 48” (122 cm by 122 cm). Please note that this is the available area and that your poster does not need to fill it completely.  For example, your poster could be 36” wide and 48” in height (portrait orientation) or 48” wide and 36” in height (landscape orientation).
  • Please check the scientific program in the CrowdCompass App (available in mid-July) for your assigned poster number, poster location, and time of the poster session.
  • Posters will be hung on free-standing poster boards with push pins (provided). If your poster is located in the Arcade, please be sure it is hung up by 10:00 am on the morning it is to be presented.  If your poster is located in the UMC Ballroom, please be sure it is hung up by 12:30.
  • Posters should be taken down between 5:30 and 6:30 pm on the day of the presentation. Posters left up after this time will be discarded.
  • Each presenter is assigned a 75-minute time slot within the poster session. At least one author named on the abstract is required to stand by the poster during the time slot that is assigned.  The time slot is indicated by the letter following the number appended to your poster title, with “A” indicating 3:00 to 4:15 pm and “B” indicating 4:15 to 5:30 pm.
    • For example, if your poster entitled “Validation of Inertial Measurement Units” is designated in the program as “095B: Validation of Inertial Measurement Units”, then you would stand by your poster from 4:15 to 5:30 pm on the day it is presented. 

 

Tips for Poster Development (adapted from ACSM poster guidelines)

  • The title, author(s) and institution are to be prominently displayed across the top of the poster with lettering height greater than 1 inch (2.5cm).
  • Poster displays may include an Abstract (in the upper left corner) and should include the following sections: Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusion, References, and/or Acknowledgements (Note: Discussion and Conclusion can be combined into a single section).
  • Include and arrange your material so a coherent and straight-forward story is told without your presence. Emphasize the most important points and avoid overwhelming the viewer with too much detail. This is important as your poster will be displayed for the entire conference, not just your session. Specific recommendations for each section include:
    • Introduction: briefly summarize the necessary background that led to this work, clearly identify the purpose of specific aims of the present study, and identify the questions asked or hypothesis(es) tested.
    • Methods: Provide sufficient detail, including the number and necessary demographics of the human or animal subjects studied.
    • Results: Can be effectively presented by table, figure, illustration and/or photograph. Make each stand on its own so the viewer doesn’t have to refer elsewhere on the display to understand the important message(s). For each table, figure, etc., a clear interpretive legend will go a long way in highlighting and explaining the essential points.
    • Discussion and Conclusion: Briefly discuss the “bottom lines” of your work.
    • Acknowledgment: Identify funding source(s), institutional support, individuals who have contributed significantly but are not listed as authors, etc.
    • Handout: Consider distributing a handout during your presentation time if there is a need for exchange of large data sets or other details.
  • Depending on the focus of the research, one also typically includes tables, figures, illustrations, and/or photographs. Large type or print font and points that can be read from several feet away should be utilized. One example that works well: a Times font in 24 point.
  • In addition to using large dark lettering, please keep in mind the following:
    • Keep tables and figures simple and uncluttered, with large font axis labels and legends.
    • Strong visual contrast is a must. Many people have difficulty distinguishing closely related colors, like green from blue, or among subtle shades of a primary color, particularly against incompatible background colors. Up to 10% of people who view your work will have some degree of color blindness.
    • Most graphic software programs have innumerable options for color and symbol shape. Although there are many terrific options which look reasonable on your computer screen, please keep in mind this may be ineffective when printed. Don’t forget that there is much to be said for using large and unique symbols or shading patterns to distinguish groups and conditions, with more sparing use of color to make these distinctions.
  • Avoid mounting materials on thick or heavy backing, as the push pins will be unable to secure it on the display boards. Push pins will be available on-site, however you are advised to bring your own in case the supply runs out.Please see this paper by Erren and Bourne (2007) for more guidelines for a good poster presentation
Thematic Posters

Thematic Posters

Note: There are TWO types of poster presentations, general and thematic. Please make sure you know which type of poster presentation you will be presenting before making your poster.  Also, there will be no audiovisual equipment in the thematic poster rooms. The 2-minute overview provided by each presenter will be done orally at the presenter’s poster.

  • Posters should be no more than 48” by 48” (122 cm by 122 cm). Please note that this is the available area and that your poster does not need to fill it completely.  For example, your poster could be 36” wide and 48” in height (portrait orientation) or 48” wide and 36” in height (landscape orientation).
  • Posters will be hung on free-standing poster boards with push pins (provided). Each individual is responsible for making sure his or her poster is hung up in the appropriate  presentation room (UMC 235 or North Dining Room) 10 minutes before the session begins. Please check the scientific program for your assigned session, location, and the order of presentations within the session.
  • Each individual is responsible for taking down his or her poster at the end of the session. Posters left up after this time will be discarded.
  • The first 30 minutes of each session are dedicated to viewing the posters for the session, which will be spaced around the room. At least one named author is required to be present during this designated viewing time (presenters should review other posters and/or their abstracts prior to the start of the session to know what the other posters present).
  • Individual thematic posters will then be presented and discussed for 10 minutes as follows:
    • 2 minutes or less: Provide a brief overview of work presented (elevator speech).
    • 7-8 minutes: Active discussion among all audience participants. Discussions may carry-over from preceding poster discussions, as all posters will be related in some aspect. Moderators should encourage discussion among all in the room rather than the question and answer format typical of the podium sessions.
    • <1 minute: Transition to next speaker
  • Session chairs will be in place to ensure that the session stays on time. Please practice your presentation prior to the session to ensure that you will fall within the 2 minute or less time limit. It is vital that each speaker stays within their given time limit.
  • Please see above under “Tips for Poster Development” for guidance on creating your poster.
    For Audience Members:
  • The success of thematic poster sessions depend on having an engaged audience.
  • Discussion should be focused on the topic, and not necessarily on the individual presentation or presenter.
  • Participants should leave having learned both about the work presented and how the work will be integrated into the field.
  • You encouraged to read ASB Past-President Paul DeVita’s advice for what makes a great thematic poster session.
Podium Presentations (Regular and Rapid)

Podium Presentations (Regular and Rapid)

  • For podium presentations, at each venue, there will be a Windows laptop and a Macintosh laptop each running the latest operating system and latest versions of Powerpoint and Keynote (Mac only). Presenters can upload their presentations in two ways:
    1. All podium presenters should have received an email with a link to a specific DropBox URL. Please upload your presentation using that link.
    2. Alternatively, you can upload you presentation in person from a flash drive in the UMC Room 247 when you are in Boulder

    Files must be uploaded prior to 5 p.m. the day before your presentation.

  • Please check the scientific program for your assigned session, location, and the order of presentations within the session.
  • Regular podium presentations: Each speaker is allotted 15 minutes in the session, with 10-12 minutes for the presentation followed by 3-5 minutes of open discussion.
  • Rapid podium presentations: This format is new this year and is being tried on a limited basis in three sessions. Each speaker is allotted only 10 minutes in the session, with 5-6 minutes for the presentation followed by 4-5 minutes of open discussion.  The rapid format permits only half the presentation time as the regular format, but speakers are discouraged from presenting the same material at twice the pace.  Rather, speakers should consider omitting details – especially descriptions of standard data collection techniques – that do not add substantially to the audience’s understanding of the work.
  • Time limits will be strictly enforced by the session chairs. Please practice your presentation beforehand to ensure that it is within the prescribed time limits.
    Tips for Podium Presentations

    (adapted from ACSM instructions for podium presenters)

  • Keep each slide uncluttered.
  • Avoid the projection of tables with more than 2-3 columns and rows.
  • Use large font sizes for all text on the slide and, especially for figure axis labels and legends.
  • Strong visual contrast is a must. Many people have difficulty distinguishing closely related colors, like green and blue, or among subtle shades of a primary color, particularly against incompatible background colors. Up to 10% of the people who view your work will have some degree of color blindness.
  • Simplicity in slide design is the key to clarity. Most graphic software programs have innumerable options for color and symbol shape. Although there are many terrific options which look reasonable on your computer screen, please keep in mind this may be ineffective when projected. Depending on your specific needs, don’t forget there is much to be said for using large and unique symbols or shading patterns to distinguish groups and conditions, with a more sparing use of color to make these distinctions.
  • Try not to present too much material. It is rare to hear that a speaker had too few slides, while it is common to hear that too many were projected during a presentation.
  • It is impossible to provide a precise recommendation for the number of slides, as it depends on the complexity of each slide with respect to how long it will take for the audience to become visually oriented, and for the speaker to discuss the salient points. A good rule of thumb is that you should aim for no more than one slide per minute of your presentation. Practice and experience should be your guide in deciding on the number of slides. Remember that you are very familiar with the work and layout of each slide, whereas audience member will need approximately twice as long to become visually oriented and understand key points.Please see this paper by Bourne (2007) for more guidelines for a good oral presentation.